Tag Archives: flowers

Great opportunities to shoot interesting pictures, despite the season…

Even in the summer, when the weather is hot and dry it is possible to find fascinating things to photograph if you take a look around. The main thing is to be creative in the way you approach your subject. ¬†Try different shots, get a different perspective, and background while you take photographs. Sometimes a different colour in the background can make a huge difference in the final composition. You can try and shoot from above or from below. You can get closer to the subject using a different lens. Think about the way you crop your subject….do you leave too much space around it? Or perhaps too little space?

Find your unique way to depict the season you love the most using creativity and emotions….and you’ll be surprised by the results!

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Xx

An unexpected guest paid a visit this morning! :-)

Look what I found this morning! A wild mushroom in a pot on my balcony…I love it when this happens!! Simple things make me happy!! ūüôā

I decided to experiment a little with colours, composition, and a shallow depth of field to make an interesting series of photographs this morning, just for fun! By using a shallow depth of field, or a wide aperture, the subject in focus is one object (or part of the object) in the frame, while the background is out of focus. This allows you to create a hierarchy of elements within the photographic composition, so choosing the right depth of field for the picture is very important. The viewer’s attention can be directed towards a particular direction, detail, or colour in the picture. A shallow depth of field is also a very effective way to convey emotions.

Are you aware of the way you use depth of field when you photograph?

Do you use a shallow or wide depth of field?

Why spontaneity is a gift.

Despite what some people might think, spontaneity doesn’t always come naturally to us….as we tend to adopt different strategies to interact with other people or avoid confrontations. We might also do this with ourselves, as a sabotaging strategy, without realizing it, to escape certain realities that make us feel uncomfortable. But pushing the boundaries often requires us to come out from our comfort zone, in order to grow.

As a dyslexic individual, I’ve always had a tendency to hide my weaknesses, as I grew up in an educational environment where I couldn’t be myself. Since then things have changed and I’m so happy about it because dyslexic individuals nowadays can talk more openly about their weaknesses and celebrate their unique strengths. This is why I believe becoming more aware and proud of our true nature is so important. Photography can be a great way to improve self-awareness and spontaneity.

What’s your point of view on this? What are the pros and cons of spontaneity?

 

 

Can mistakes sometimes be beneficial?

Often what we consider mistakes can bring some kind of benefit to our lives. In photography, for example, ¬†there are plenty of rules that we can decide to follow if we want to, but shooting with an open mind can give us surprising results. Always leave a margin for mistakes, as this can lead to a more personal and unique interpretation of the world around us. ¬†Photographs can convey deep feelings and emotions, ¬†as long as we are able to freely express ourselves through the lens. The same thing happens when we learn any new skill…We have to experiment and make mistakes to learn something and if someone tells us what to do, is usually not enough, as we have to find our way around it.

Do you follow any aesthetic rule in photography? Which one and why?

Would you consider shooting photos more spontaneously? Why/Why not?

 

 

Thriving through boundaries.

Sometimes we take decisions which lead us towards a less comfortable situation, pushing our boundaries so that we can grow into e new version of ourselves. ¬†This often takes some kind of courage and, therefore, it’s not an easy thing to do. We like our good and bad habits because we know what to expect. But the nicest things happen when we thing outside the box.

In the past three years I’ve been learning about how to become a teacher, which at first felt pretty uncomfortable, in the same way I had some issues calling myself a photographer after twenty years of experience shooting in studio. But learning to become a better teacher might have made me a better version of myself, and perhaps a better photographer. ¬†I don’t know, but I’d like to think so. Anyway, it feels good to look back and realize that we are not in the same place we were not long ago, as a really good friend said to me.

Just above the city…

It’s becoming a good habit of mine, to walk around town with a friend, my dog and my camera. Usually, you are so familiar with the place you live in that several things can get unnoticed, especially small things. The camera often works as a magnifying glass, where ordinary things gain importance while they are put into a different context. You choose and select the world around you in order to create a sequence of images which convey a personal vision and tell a unique story.

Around Genoa with my personal assistent…

Looking up…

Sunday morning spent looking up…
Easy, relaxing shots. My kind of yoga exercise…slowly getting into my daily routine!
A 50 mm lens changes everything, style and prospettive, getting farther away from the subject and giving the opportunity of using empty space, to draw the viewer attention through the composition.